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Cryo-Electron Tomography

Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is a technique enabling the visualization of frozen hydrated biological samples intact from harmful preparation process. Cryo-ET uses an electron microscope to record a series of 2D projection images acquired by tilting a biological sample held at cryogenic temperature. Using computational methods, the 3D images can be aligned and combined mathematically to generate a 3D (tomographic) reconstruction of the sample. A more complete understanding of the particle morphology is accessible by extracting individual slices in different orientations. The 3D volume can also be examined to resolve any ambiguities of the 2D images. Our cryo-ET services lead the global market with unique advantages:

  1. 3D structure reconstruction at 2-5 Å resolution
  2. Visualization of intracellular, undisturbed organization of macromolecules
  3. State-of-the-art instrument
  4. Versatile data analysis, including 2D suitability and averaging, and 3D reconstruction from existing data sets, and 3D structure refinement

Known as an advanced technology for in frozen hydrated biologic samples. Cryo-ET is able to bridge the gap between ultrastructural compartmentalization and the structural analysis of molecular inhabitants. It is also powerful in characterize drug delivery vehicles, showing their structure, cargos and interactions with tissues and cells.

Schematic representation of the cryo-ET workflow. Figure 1. Schematic representation of the cryo-ET workflow.

Creative Biostructure is equipped with state-of-the-art electron microscopes and expertise in cryo-ET. We are always determined to work with our clients closely to solve problems, which will benefit the complete understanding of cell biology and drug design and development in the long run.

Feel free to contact us for more information.

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Reference

  1. Lučić, V.; et al. Cryo-electron tomography: The challenge of doing structural biology in situ. J Cell Biol Aug 2013, 202 (3) 407-419.